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David O

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Guest ASchwartz

Hi Everyone,

I agree with David, know all the books he suggested and they are all excellent.

Here is my recommendation to be added to David's list: Get some really good and fun novels. Some adventure stories, mysteries, or whatever "floats your boat" as they say, and, just enjoy.

Allan:)

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erm ok, dunno if this is the right place but, one book that I found helpful, and quite informative when I first started CBT, is :-

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Dummies. author, Rob Wilson

It just explained things a little simpler for me, and in a way that I can understand. Hope its useful to someone else. :)

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For those who have ADD or ADHD, I suggest Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perception by Thom Hartmann.

For general self help: Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart by Gordon Livingston.

For boundary setting: Boundaries: Where You End And I Begin by Anne Katherine.

That's all for now. I found these books to be of great help. Hope you do as well.

- Anonymous

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When I've heard this song after beginning of my therapy (after about 3 months) I felt that it is decsribing the feelings associated with my change. It (the lyrics/text) is not literally true, but... the quality/greatnes of the change is really of this kind :)

The Hollies: I'm Alive

Did you ever see a man with no heard

Baby that was me

I'm just a lonely lonely man with no heart

'Till you set me free

Now I can breathe

I can see

I can touch

I can feel

I can taste all the sugar sweetness in your kiss

Feel all the happiness I ever missed

I never felt like this

I'm alive

I'm alive

I'm alive

Well I used to think that I was living

Baby I was wrong

No I never knew a thing about living

'Till you came along

Now I can breathe

I can see

I can touch

I can feel

I can taste all the sugar sweetness in your lips

Feel all the happiness I never missed

I never felt like you

I'm alive

I'm alive

I'm alive

Now I can breathe

I can see

I can touch

I can feel

I can taste all the sugar sweetness in your kiss

Feel all the happiness I never missed

I never felt like this

I'm alive

I'm alive

I'm alive

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Guest ASchwartz

I want to strongly recommend and reinforce what has been recommended: All the books by Yalom are wonderful.

In addition, read Jon Kabat-Zinn, Wherever You Go There You Are A wonderful book about meditation and how to do it. Strongly recommeded.

Allan:)

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The non-clinical stuff--- there are numerous excellent books around worth a second look:

The Life of Pi

Reflections on the Art of Living: A Joesph Campbell Companion (very deep and grounded in cultural anthropology)

Women Who Run With Wolves

The Power of Now

The Alchemist

From Aging to Saging

The Autobiography of God

Three Cups of Tea

The Tipping Point

Freakonomics- A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Rogue Nation (an excellent critique of US foreign policy)

Forgive and Forget (excellent resource for those struggling with forgiveness)

Enjoy your read!

David

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Here's a list of books I feel are helpful in the addictions area:

Recovery Options: The Complete Guide--Joseph Volpicelli & Maia Szalavitz

AA Not the Only Way--Melanie Soloman

Sober for Good--Anne Fletcher

The Truth About Addiction and Recovery--Stanton Peele

7 Tools to Beat Addiction--Stanton Peele

Changing for Good--James O. Prochaska, John Norcross, Carlo DiClemente

ML

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The Biology of Love by Arthur Janov: Seriously heavy going but explains all about his theories and research into the biochemistry and mechanisms of the neurological system with respect to our processing of information and emotions. He illustrates the connections between the things we call love and the physical things that go on inside. It really really makes a physical difference to your health to be hugged regularly!

Embracing The Wide Sky by Daniel Tammet: An autistic savant, Daniel illustrates beautifully how we all have amazing capacity to do fantastic things. It is an easy read and an inspiration to anyone sidelined by society because they are "different".

Life, and how to survive it. by Skynner and Cleese: Skynner is perhaps most famous for his group and family therapy models and John Cleese is famous for his comedy. Both very well recognised for their ability to communicate. Together they present an inspiring and insightful book which looks into issues relating to mental health and common life experiences.

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As Mona Lisa suggested, I thoroughly recommend The Bipolar Survival Guide. It's more of a help for those dealing with someone who has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Almost everyone in my family read that book once I was dx'd with bipolar.

Just some books that I love:

First Person Plural by Dr. Cameron West - the author's autobiography on living with DID

The Glory Field by Walter Dean Myers - generations of African-Americans living in America, starting when the first African in the family was brought to the US on a slave ship, and ending in the 1990's; very moving

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom - a man goes to visit his dying professor & ends up being taught, once again, about life; this book changed my life!

*A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer

*The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer

These two books are autobiographical, and are about the author's troubled childhood as being abused (in the first book) & his life as a foster child (in the second book). Can be triggering, but I loved them. Good books, just make sure to take breaks & stay in reality.

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I wish I had time for leisure reading. But, if I did have time for leisure reading, I doubt I could sit down and read very many books. Of the works I have managed to read, I suggest:

Non-Fiction

Getting Things Done, by David Allen

Existentialism is a Humanism, by Jean-Paul Sartre

Schopenhauer as Educator, by Friedrich Nietzsche

Fiction

Bel Canto, by Ann Patchett

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Guest ASchwartz

I want to stronly urge everyone to read all of the books by John Kabat-Zinn.

They can only serve to help all of us. I mean it.

Allan

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Hi again Allan :)

A mystery - ooooh! Can't resist being pulled into a mystery. :)

So now I'm going to do the psychologist thing and ask:

"Could you tell us more about that?" :)

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Hey Allan, I just got my hands on a copy of Wherever You Go, There You Are. A very interesting book! After reading a few sections I managed to take a few moments for some of the suggested exercises. Even during exam period the exercises offer a different take on things.

The book is divided into small sections and that really plays well with my current workload. Neatly packaged messages I can slip in quick during the day. This appears to be the sort of book I may end up referring to often.

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Get any Tapes and Cds of these Great God Inspired Writers: Wayne Dyer, Louise Hay, Marianna Williamson, Eckart Tolle, Kahlil Gibran ''The Prophet" . Og Mandino. just a few to start you off, yum yum what a treat. :eek:

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I've heard good things about this one, and have it but haven't read it myself yet. Apparently it has changed many peoples lives and has been a great influence around the world...........................

The Secret ;)

Has anyone read it?? Have any thoughts on the book??

Cheers

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Guest ASchwartz

Hi Luna, Kaudio, David and all,

Kaudio: Yes, "Wherever you go, there you are" is a book to be used over and over again.

Luna:

While I am recovering from my shoulder surgery I have gone back to my childhood and am reading Sherlock Holmes. Its fun. I am also reading Agatha Christie, also fun. Then, there are dozens of modern ones, some of which I like and some I do not. Dan Brown is good, Johnathan Ketterman, etc.

David O: I do not like books like, "One Nation Under Therapy," because the author has an ax to grind. Our problems are not the result of too much therapy. As it is, too many refuse therapy, even today, although they are in desparate need.

Allan:)

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I noticed The Alchemist on the list and want to recommend the Pilgrimage also by Paulo Coelho. I have read most of his books, some ok some not so ok. This is a good one though.

Another old favorite of mine (Bit old though, but a classic) is The Road Less Travelled by M Scott Peck.

Happy reading

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