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How Pervassive are Personality Disorders?


Someguy
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My experiences are people with personality disorders often make you feel like you have a personality disorder if you come in conflict with them.

There are people out there that want you to chronically agree with them and give approval....and if you upset that, then that makes you unfit as a person.

That's quite the opposite of the behavior I experienced. I simply accepted people's disagreement and their chronic disapproval of me.....with much force might I add. Hey, I don't talk much, I use to stutter, and for somebody to put me down with a great deal of fervor that seems like overkill to me.

I've come to the conclusion that I can no longer support people's egos. If I find that your behavior is more out of control rather then cause and effect, I'm let'n loose.

Hey, I met this girl that use to tell me she loved me and wanted me to be her next boyfriend, then would talk about her fiance in front of me? What the hell is that?....she never married her fiance, and married some other guy 10 years later.

I had one of my managers imitate my facial paralysis because he thought it was funny....heck why not imitate cripples and burn victims while you're at it?

I've experienced that behavior before....repeatedly. Chronically. From other people....enough.

Personally, I think personality disorders are more pervasive then we'd like to admit. Since BPD is in at least 2 percent of the general population, and there are many variations of personality disorders.....I would think that personality disorders in general must be in at least 10 percent of the general population if not more. Of course that's a guess on my part.....but whatever research I've read seems to be guesstimates as well since 'they' only diagnose a sampling of the general population.

Basically, I'm saying that since Personality Disorders are so pervasive in our society....how do you know you have one?

And if it is pervasive, why is that considered abnormal?

I know this message might indicate I have a personality disorder, but knowing how my prior posts were about how exclusionary people can be.....might be more to it?

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And if it is pervasive, why is that considered abnormal?

That is an excellent question :D

Seriously, i went to a seminar not long ago and the estimate of personality disorder diagnoses in the general (north american) population was placed between 15% and 19%. That is a staggering number of cases if that is true.

how do you know you have one?

it basically comes down to behavior applied rigidly across circumstances which call for flexibility in responding which results in a person experiencing significant social or occupational problems, or which (as you observe) results in the people around that person feeling like they are having social problems. For instance, someone who is a controlling person at work in a job as a manager might get a promomtion from the big boss, but if that controlling nature is carried into family and social relationship circumstances, there is a good chance that there is an issue happening. But the controlling person might think that everyone else is rebellious and not recognize that her own controllingness is the issue. it's gonna seem normal to her; it's all she's ever known. Many people who have one won't know it by definition; they will think people around them have one.

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  • 5 weeks later...

What is normal? In addition to being a setting on a dryer.

When I think of normal, two words come to mind: balance and appropriate.

Balance to me means, for example: underexited or overexited. Or, overdo or underdo. Getting angry at another person's poor driving may be overexcitement. This would be, basically, across the board.

Aprropriate means just that. For example: Saying or doing in the proper place. A boss, at work, gives direction; he does not give direction to his wife or brother.

Clearly, there is a lot more involved, but those two ideas come to my mind.

Just a small rumination.

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  • 1 year later...
Guest ASchwartz

Hi Someguy,

My experiences are people with personality disorders often make you feel like you have a personality disorder if you come in conflict with them.

That is well said and I must congratulate you. This is true of all personality disordered people and Borderline particularly.

However, I often worry that some of our diagnostic areas become over diagnosed and I question whether this is happening with BPD?

Allan :confused:

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People with "personality disorders"....don't make you feel anything. I am not saying that to you to be a wise ass. I am saying that to you so that you are empowered and assured your feelings are not at the mercy of someone outside of yourself.

I've had people ostracize me and hunt me down like Frankenstein simply because I was different......no, people can make you 'feel' alright.

My father use to come home from work and be in raged to the point of psychosis, stay up all night and rant at my mother she just being there to keep him under control. I can tell my father was terrorized at work, so he was 'feeling' something. He worked as a freight manager at an airport, so he wasn't exactly working with enlightened people. I suspect my father was bipolar, but he was never diagnosed.

I think this sticks and stones may hurt my bones, but names will never hurt me is complete nonsense.

I've met an instructor who I suspect was BPD. She'd go off on the slightest remark she thought was going to annihilate her ego. To a certain extent I identified with her behavior....to a certain extent I could tell how destructive it was. I didn't believe it was freeing, just opening yourself up to more 'predatory' people.

I don't think it's so much ignoring what other people say or how you react to it, just being mindful of what others say and put in context.

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That's just it. That's not just childhood.

The instructor I was referring to was a college professor.

My father acted like that well into his 60's.

And I had a manager at a retail store imitate my facial paralysis.

No, there's something going on, and it goes on well beyond childhood.

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  • 1 month later...

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/43/15/38

This thread indicates that 6 percent of the general population, based on a sampling of 35,000 people, have Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

However, the previous link I posted:

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1870491,00.html

Was based on 35,000 people and stated that 5.9 percent of the general population have Borderline Personality Disorder.

There's a possibility since both studies have the same amount of people both done in the same time frame that maybe both studies are based on the 'same' sampling of people? They did 2 studies on the same test?

5.9 percent BPD and 6 percent NPD. It's been said that there's a blurring of NPD and BPD traits, and they could be co-morbid traits.

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Guest ASchwartz

Hi someguy,

I have not followed this thread to its beginning and so I do not know what the stats have to do with. However, I will say this: For those with personality disorders, it really feels miserable.

Allan

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest GingerSnap

Narcissistic Personality versus Narcissistic Personality Disorder, the way I understand it is that once it negatively effects your life, it becomes a disorder? My husband most definitely has a narcissistic personality and in my opinion he has a sexual disorder that came into play as a result of maintaining his "personality" of denying intimacy and sexual intimacy. Then, I am thinking that it grows - the dysfunctional behaviors to "feed" the needs of the personality, a sort of whatever it takes to get the job done mentality. Now, I never seen him as feeling miserable, just trying to make those feel miserable around him, unless he is unable to "feed" his personality at which time he becomes almost dysfunctional - a madness? Just my thoughts on the whole thing since I have to try to understand everything - I suppose that is some dysfunctional personality too.

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I will agree with you, gingersnap. Their are a few Personality Disorders that people can have that are masters of manipulating others , see themselves as the centers of the universe, are self deserving, cunning, controlling, or predators . I am not quite sure these type of individuals are miserable either. However, the majority of personality disorders do not lead to people with happy lives. It is not uncommon for those to also have co- morbid disorders, as well. Making things even more difficult and chalenging.

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http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/articles/050623/23balance.htm?s_cid=related-links:TOP

This article indicates that 20 percent of people that were direct witness of 911 Twin Towers were 'self enhancers'.....indicating narcisistic traits.

"Self-enhancers are somewhat grandiose," says Dr. George Bonanno, associate professor of clinical psychology and the lead researcher in the study. "They are preoccupied with themselves, they score high on measures of narcissism, and the research shows pretty clearly that they are annoying to be around."

Eh, so I have OCD traits.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
I will agree with you, gingersnap. Their are a few Personality Disorders that people can have that are masters of manipulating others , see themselves as the centers of the universe, are self deserving, cunning, controlling, or predators . I am not quite sure these type of individuals are miserable either. However, the majority of personality disorders do not lead to people with happy lives. It is not uncommon for those to also have co- morbid disorders, as well. Making things even more difficult and chalenging.

Are you saying that this is true of any and all people who suffer any said personality disorders?

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Narcissism is very much rampant in contemporary western society - probably has been since the 1960s. This is not to say that every third person is a narcissist, but rather that we (as a generalized culture) end up celebrating narcissists and cooperating with them to elevate them to positions of fame/power. My two cents anyway.

Personality disorders are social disorders because identity is a social process. So - when someone has a personality disorder, what ends up happening is either they suffer, or those around them suffer, or both. In the case of narcissism, so long as the narcissist's needs are met, he does not suffer, but those around him do. If there is a period where the narcissist's needs do not get met, the narcissist suffers as well as those around him. If you look at a reasonably closely allied personality disorder like borderline personality disorder (BPD), you find that the person with BPD suffers as well as those around her.

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  • 1 month later...
The current prevalence estimate is that about 20 percent of the U.S. population are affected by mental disorders during a given year. This estimate comes from two epidemiologic surveys: the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) study of the early 1980s and the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) of the early 1990s. Those surveys defined mental illness according to the prevailing editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (i.e., DSM-III and DSM-IIIR). The surveys estimate that during a 1-year period, 22 to 23 percent of the U.S. adult population—or 44 million people—have diagnosable mental disorders, according to reliable, established criteria. In general, 19 percent of the adult U.S. population have a mental disorder alone (in 1 year); 3 percent have both mental and addictive disorders; and 6 percent have addictive disorders alone.3 Consequently, about 28 to 30 percent of the population have either a mental or addictive disorder (Regier et al., 1993b; Kessler et al., 1994). Table 2-6 summarizes the results synthesized from these two large national surveys.

http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/mentalhealth/chapter2/sec2_1.html

Basically, I obsess about this because what your uninformed peers tell you and what statistical information tells you are usually conflicting and based on assumptions.

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Once you recognize that it's your peers that are uninformed, though, does that help you with the "obsessing"?

It doesn't take much to convince me that there are a lot of people who are having difficulties, and all hiding it from each other. And once convinced, I can dismiss the uninformed fairly easily.

Maybe it's worth looking into why their opinions matter so much, to you?

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  • 2 months later...

http://stanford.wellsphere.com/alcoholism-article/1-in-5-young-adults-has-a-personality-disorder/732678

1 in 5 young adults between the ages of 19 to 25 have a personality disorder. Most of the disorders that were recognized were Antisocial Personality Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder......article seems to elude to alcoholism as a marker rather then an instigator.

I'm on my little crusade because I'm trying to figure out what is normal? I think being aware of behavior is like having street smarts. It's like knowing not to go down a dark alley at one o'clock in the morning in the middle of an urban jungle.

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Guest ASchwartz

Hi Someguy,

I want to urge you to avoid dealing with the word "normal." No one knows what normal is anyway.

However, being aware of your behavior is like having street smarts. We can gain control over that which we are aware of but we cannot if we are not aware. That's where psychotherapy comes in.

Allan:)

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