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More questions!?


Calla
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Guest nejiwhopper

Hi Calla;

Ever since I had an allergic to some meds, I am in the habit of doing research on the internet about each and every med I am given even supplements. I know that there are some meds that over long term use can do damage to your kidneys, liver and stomach. Have you researched your meds on the internet at all? If you still have questions, call your pdoc's office and ask about them.

I too will have the same kind of obsessive thinking you described. I am teaching and if I have a bad situation with one of my students or another teacher, I will replay it over and over and over again, sometimes for more than a day. I'm interested to see what someone else says about this. I think my pdoc once told me that most people with a mental illness will have some obsessive thinking to some extent.

Even though I've been through CBT twice, it seems to me that my brain is just hardwired to only think in the negative. To think positively takes a real effort on my part. Some days I am just so tired that I can't get up the energy to be positive. It's strange that to be positive seems to take so much energy and effort but being negative is so natural. What I try to do every morning before I get out of bed is repeat to myself at least 5 times: "Today is going to be a good day. Today good things will happen for me". Sometimes I will continue saying this while I'm getting ready: in the shower, getting dressed, putting on my makeup. It seems to help get me some positive energy and start me off with some positiveness.

Neji

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Hi Calla,

1). You can take anti-sickness medicine if the sickness if bothering you, it's not bad for you but the drugs just have other effects that are unwanted.

2). Thinking a conversation over and over and not letting it go is normal, i do it quite often, you just keep thinking about it and all the things you could have done differently and it makes you feel so bad, such a fool. The hard part is accepting it is in the past and there is nothing you can do but forget about it.

Being annoyed about the door open is also 'normal', things like that happen to me quite often too, i might get annoyed about the leaves of a plant being parted, about a glass being on a table distracting my line of sight etc. Nothing to worry about and i don't think your being obsessive.

3). the ADs will take a little time to work, just stick with it and i'm sure you'll begin to feel better soon!

Hope i helped a little..

Take Care :(

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Whether or not it becomes OCD is dependant on how much it affects your life. EG: Are you prevented from getting to places on time because you have to make sure the curtains are neat, every little spec of dust is gone and make sure everything is switched off, all doors shut etc.

If they are bothering you to the point where you find it difficult to cope with them then treatment is available to you, so don't be too saddened.

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Guest nejiwhopper

Another thing to keep in mind is that the improvement you will have from the meds will be gradual. So you won't wake up one morning and they'll be gone. But some things will need therapy in addition to the tablets because you need to learn to change your thought process. Like you said, it's become second nature to think one way and the meds aren't going to change your thought process totally. The meds and therapy are the most effective route.

I noticed you're from the UK and I think maybe the term "pdoc" is something most people from the U.S. may use. It sounds like your healthcare system is a bit different than ours. Usually, in the U.S. I would go to a "pdoc" for meds and also a therapist or counselor. I could get meds from depression or anxiety from a GP but anything other than or if they don't work, the GP will refer you to a pdoc as they are more qualified.

I should ask, does GP mean for you a General Practioner....a regular doctor?

Neji

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Guest nejiwhopper

I thought I was going to have a hard time too. If you can get some recommendations and find yourself a really good therapist, they know how to make you comfortable. I found it hard to just sit and start talking so my therapist would also ask open ended questions. She also gave me homework that allowed me to right things out and then go over them in our sessions. It took a bit of time, but soon I felt comfortable.

They usually understand these kinds of things and know how to help you.

I hope you'll decide to give it try. What is the absolute worst thing that could happen if you went?

I always ask myself this question when faced with having to do something uncomfortable and if the answer isn't "I will die" then I know I have to do it. I always remind myself of other times when I had anxiety about doing something and everything turned out ok or I ended up liking it.

Hugs,

Neji

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